Des merrion bespoke tailor

Double Breasted Waistcoat

Double Breasted Waistcoat

The making of a double-breasted waistcoat is not as simple as it may at first sound. Double breasted waistcoats are difficult to make and fit, well to make and fit correctly ! Getting any waistcoat to fit correctly can make lesser tailors cry. Waistcoats need to fit the shoulders without any cracks, drags, lines and pulls of any kind. The front edge should be snug and tight to the chest, and the bottom edge close to the body without standing off. If your waistcoat has any of the above symptoms then it doesn’t fit right.

The pictures below show a DB waistcoat pattern I have just drafted for a client, and the actual cloth cut out. This waistcoat will also have a DB peaked lapel with a collar when finished, combined with two lower welt pockets. For more information and to commission real bespoke tailored suits look at my website www.desmerrion.com

Double breasted waistcoat pattern i have drafted.

Double breasted waistcoat pattern i have drafted.

double breasted waistcoat.

Waistcoat cut out ready to be fitted up.

2 replies
  1. Tony Chow
    Tony Chow says:

    I love DB waistcoats. I’ve been thinking about the proper length of a DB waistcoat. Many made today are simply too long and don’t look good.

    It seems that a good rule of thumb is that the middle button of a 6×3 waistcoat is that the middle button should line up with the natural waist. People have been known to wear even shorter ones in the past. Fred Astaire, for example, wore waistcoats that ended at the waistline. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

    Reply
    • Desmond Merrion
      Desmond Merrion says:

      The main problem with waistcoats today regarding the correct length is the trouser rise. The trouser rise dictates the length of any waistcoat, especially DB waistcoats. Most men today dislike trousers with what I would consider a sensible rise. I don’t think a 10″ rise is particularly high, I frequently cut myself trousers with a 12″ rise. If the trousers are worn low, then the waistcoat has to be cut longer to cover the trouser waistband. I would not cut a waistcoat for any client that wanted to wear his trousers ‘low’. Modern off the peg suits have a trouser rise of roughly between 8-9″, some are lower …..

      The middle button lining up with the natural waist is a fair point and does work, but only if the client is proportionate in size and height. The aim of any tailor should be to ensure that his customers look totally in proportion with the trousers, waistcoat and coat all working in harmony. Fred Astaire wore high rise trousers, (most men did then) combined with a well balanced coat length, hence his waistcoats always looked correct in length.

      Reply

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